Woman making a frame around the sun with her hands at sunrise
Woman making a frame around the sun with her hands at sunrise
Woman making a frame around the sun with her hands at sunrise

Speak Now: Consultation on Solvency Funding for Defined Benefit (DB) Pension Plans

August 2016 Employment and Labour Bulletin 3 minutes read

In the 2016 provincial budget, the Government of Ontario launched a review of the current solvency funding regime for DB pension plans. In its recent consultation paper, Review of Ontario’s Solvency Funding Framework for Defined Benefit Pension Plans, the Government proposes several approaches to changing the current DB solvency funding regime.

Comments on the consultation paper are due by September 30, 2016. The Government intends to hold a second public consultation on any proposed funding reforms that arise out of the consultation process in the Fall of 2016. Employers with DB pension plans and DB pension plan sponsors and administrators are encouraged to speak now and submit comments.

Ontario’s Current DB Funding Regime

Currently, Ontario registered DB pension plans must be funded on the greater of a going concern or solvency basis. Going concern funding assumes that the pension plan will continue indefinitely. Any deficit determined on a going concern basis must be eliminated through special payments over a period of no more than 15 years. Solvency funding assumes that the pension plan will be wound up on the applicable valuation date. Subject to certain exceptions, any deficit determined on a solvency basis must be eliminated through special payments over a period of no more than 5 years.

Given the current economic climate and prolonged low interest rates, many DB pension plans are in deficit on a solvency basis, requiring many employers to make large special payments within a 5 year period. Many employers have found the solvency funding requirements to be onerous, which led the Government to introduce special temporary funding relief measures in 2009 and 2012 and prompted the consultation process that is underway.

Proposed Changes to Ontario’s DB Funding Regime

The consultation paper sets out two approaches to changing the current DB funding rules:

1.     Modify Solvency Funding Regime

The options suggested under this approach include allowing DB pension plan sponsors to amortize deficits over a longer period of time (for example, 10 years rather than 5 years) and reducing the target for solvency funding from the current 100% to a lower threshold (for example, 80%).

2.     Eliminate Solvency Funding Regime

The options suggested under this approach include eliminating the solvency funding regime and enhancing the going concern funding requirements by, for example, requiring a funding cushion (a required amount in excess of the plan’s liabilities that must be funded before the plan sponsor can take any action that could potentially weaken the plan’s funded position). Alternatively, the Government proposes enhancing the going concern funding requirements by requiring that special payments be amortized over a shorter period than the current 15 year period and requiring that the superintendent set the maximum interest rate that may be used for the purposes of determining the plan’s going concern funding requirement.

The consultation paper also proposes a number of other proposed reforms, including increasing employer-paid assessments to the Pension Benefits Guarantee Fund, requiring plan administrators to conduct an annual actuarial valuation report, and requiring plan sponsors to create and implement a written funding policy.

Changes to DB Funding Regimes Across Canada

The review of the solvency funding regime for DB pension plans in Ontario comes in the wake of the introduction of alternative funding regimes in Alberta, British Columbia and Quebec. Significantly, effective January 1, 2016, Quebec eliminated the solvency funding requirements for private sector DB pension plans in exchange for a more robust going-concern funding regime. While DB pension plan funding reform is in its infancy in Ontario, the national trend suggests that changes may occur in the near future.

by Stefanie Di Francesco and Lyndsay Wasser

A Cautionary Notea cautionary note

The foregoing provides only an overview and does not constitute legal advice. Readers are cautioned against making any decisions based on this material alone. Rather, specific legal advice should be obtained.

© McMillan LLP 2016

Related Publications

post
Publication

Upcoming Changes to Ontario’s Auto Insurance Regime

Apr 12, 2021

The regulation of Ontario’s auto insurance market may undergo several key changes to enhance consumer
protection and foster greater competition and innovation.

post
Publication

Client Focused Reforms (CFRs): Everything you need to know about the new conflicts of interest requirements (but were afraid to ask)

Apr 12, 2021

The June 30, 2021 deadline for registered firms and their representatives to comply with the first phase of the CFRs relating to conflicts of interest is fast approaching. The new conflicts of interest requirements will require registrants to review and, where necessary, implement changes to their existing conflicts of interest policies and procedures.

post
Publication

British Columbia Employers Now at Risk of Expedited Workplace Closures

Apr 12, 2021

Effective April 12, 2021, health authorities will have the power to order the temporary closure of businesses as a
result of COVID-19 outbreaks in the workplace