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Who ya gonna call (out)? Government of Canada introduces tip line to report federal contract fraud

April 2017 Procurement Bulletin 2 minutes read

On April 20, 2017, the Government of Canada took another step to enhance the Integrity Regime for government contracting, with the introduction of a new Federal Contracting Fraud Tip Line (the “Tip Line”)[1].  A dedicated telephone line, and online form allow Canadians to anonymously report possible fraud, collusion or corruption in federal contracts or real property agreements.  The Tip Line is a joint initiative between the Competition Bureau, Public Services and Procurement Canada and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

While the addition of the Tip Line does not change the Integrity Regime’s application to government suppliers, this new development may result in increased enforcement of the regime.  While the Government of Canada encourages individuals who witness or suspect unethical business practices to use the Tip Line, it is possible that suppliers will use the Tip Line to report competitors in order to gain a competitive advantage in supplying the federal government with goods or services.

The Integrity Regime was introduced in 2015, and seeks to ensure the government only does business with ethical suppliers in Canada and abroad.  The Integrity Regime seeks to implement best practices for procurement through a transparent and rigorous set of standards.  For more information about the Integrity Regime and its development, consult previous McMillan bulletins on this topic, or contact a member of McMillan’s Procurement Group.[2]

by Michael Rankin, Timothy Cullen and Shauna Cant (Student-at-Law)

[1] April 20, 2017: Government of Canada launches tip line to help Canadians report federal contracting fraud.
[2] For Better or For Worse? Canada Updates Procurement Integrity Regime; In the Great Future, You Can’t Forget Your Past – Update to the Government of Canada’s Integrity Regime Provides Clarity, Includes General Anti-Avoidance Provisions.

A Cautionary Note

The foregoing provides only an overview and does not constitute legal advice. Readers are cautioned against making any decisions based on this material alone. Rather, specific legal advice should be obtained.

© McMillan LLP 2017

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